Plastics Technology

SEP 2018

Plastics Technology - Dedicated to improving Plastics Processing.

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tions for plastics and rubber machinery makers in collaboration with other associations, including NPE organizer the Plastics Industry Association (PLASTICS; plasticsindustry.org). At the NPE2018 press breakfast immediately prior to the show's opening on May 7, Glenn Anderson, show chairman and senior v.p. of sales, marketing and product management at Milacron (milacron.com), noted that suppliers on both sides of the Atlantic continue to collabo- rate on OPC-UA. "Industry 4.0 is here to stay," Anderson said, "and we're going to have to come up with standards. A very, very important aspect of our business is that we're going to have to have policies." Progress on the injec- tion molding front was announced at the show during a EUROMAP press tour where several suppliers discussed the newly created EUROMAP 77 standard for data exchange between a press and an MES (manu- facturing execution system) central computer. EUROMAP acknowledged in a press release the need to address communications for auxil - iary equipment within a cell, citing two standards in development—EUROMAP 82, data exchange between injection molding machines and temperature-control devices; and EUROMAP 79, data exchange between presses and robots. As promised prior to the show, Industry 4.0 featured prominently in the booths of auxiliary equipment suppliers at NPE2018. But just as processors are trying to figure out how it will impact their businesses, machinery sup- pliers are likewise puzzling out how they will bring the technology to market. Conversations with those suppliers in Orlando revealed some key questions that remain to be answered, and the responses ulti- mately will affect the products that processors will be able to buy. Top issues to resolve: Will equipment suppliers build their own 4.0 platform or partner with firms that have already created programs, albeit often for indus- tries outside plastics processing? And if these equipment OEMs want their machines to "talk" to other pieces of machinery in a customer's plant, what language should they teach them to ensure a fully conversant cell? The outlines of answers came more into focus in Orlando, as some suppliers announced new or augmented 4.0 capabilities that they've developed independently or in partnerships; and movement towards that common language, OPC-UA, also advanced. Development of machine-to- machine communications standards is being spearheaded by the European (EUROMAP) and German (VDMA) associa- By Tony Deligio Senior Editor 06 Caption Description Industry 4.0 dominated the news in auxiliary equipment at the show, but many questions remain for both suppliers and processors. NPE2018 REPORT Auxiliaries: A Path to Industry 4.0 Emerges Biplab Pal, CTO and co-founder of MachineSense, walks NPE attendees through his company's suite of Industry 4.0 tools. During the show, MachineSense announced that those tools will become part of Siemens' MindSphere platform. 10 SEPTEMBER 2018 Plastics Technology PTonline.com N P E R E P O R T Close -Up On Technolog y

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