Plastics Technology

SEP 2018

Plastics Technology - Dedicated to improving Plastics Processing.

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Also aimed at new mobility options are new thermoplastics from SABIC. Among them is a new high-heat, high-energy-density dielectric material, Ultem UTF120 PEI film, in 5-10 micron thicknesses. It is used to produce lightweight auxiliary capacitors that can help offset the weight of battery packs in electric vehicles. Another example is new Noryl NHP5054, an enhanced flame-retardant, glass-filled PPE that achieves a UL 94V-0 rating at 0.75 mm for structural compo- nents like battery-pack housing assemblies. SABIC also showcased what it calls a major breakthrough in production of infrared optical sensor lenses for proximity sensing and gesture recognition in smartphones, video-game control- lers, and drones, using its Extem thermoplastic polyimide (TPI). It sports high thermal dimen- sional stability with a Tg of 512 F (267 C). Other similar resins are either not melt processable or cannot be injection molded. High-volume micromolding of Extem is said to deliver numerous advantages over grinding and polishing of quartz glass and curing of epoxy resin—speed, consistently high quality, and avoidance of costly secondary operations. SABIC showed lenses made of Extem TPI overmolded with nylon 12. MORE CUSTOMIZED TPES An extended family of nylon-based TPEs, also known as polyether-block-amides (PEBA), was showcased by Nylon Corp. of America (NYCOA; nycoa.net). With lower specific gravity than TPUs, they are aimed at applications in automotive, sporting goods, personal elec- tronics, composites, and specialty films, the Ny-Flex elastomer range is available in hard- nesses from 82 Shore D to 90 A. They are said to exhibit excellent flexibility at low tempera- ture, superior retention of properties at elevated temperature, and exceptional toughness and resilience. High creep resistance, strong resistance to flex fatigue, good abrasion resis- tance, and superior resistance to grease, oils, and solvents are also claimed. Lubrizol Corp. (lubrizol.com) show- cased new products such as Estane TPU for 3D printing and Pearlthane Eco TPU, with up to 46% bio- based-content, lower density, and improved low-temperature flexibility for highly flexible films or soft-touch injection molded parts. Also new is Estane VSN self- healing TPU, with unique ability to heal minor scratches in consumer products such as high-end eyewear; and Estane ALR TPU for paint protection and graphics wraps on commercial trucks. Compatible with adhesives and topcoats, it is invisible and boasts self-healing and both impact and weather resistance. BIOPLASTICS HIGHLIGHTS Working with Electrolux and another OEM, NatureWorks (natureoworksllc.com) showcased newly developed refrigerator liners based on PLA to compete with existing HIPS structures. Now in field testing, one approach involves coextruding sheets with an acrylic core and an outside layer of Ingeo PLA, which are then thermoformed. Both layers are impact modified. Ascend's new nylon 66 copolymers for food and industrial pack- aging reportedly have both better clarity and puncture resistance than nylons 6 and 66. At Athena, we understand your unique hot runner system needs. That's why we engineer products like our new RMX modular hot runner controller with a touchscreen display and superior functionality and communications. Athena still off ers our popular IMP, RMA and RMB modular controllers and you can mix and match in a standard mainframe to suit your unique needs. And Athena still off ers world-class non-modular controllers. Get all our products from your local distributor or online. Find your hot runner controllers at www.AthenaControls.com Find your hot runner controllers at www.AthenaControls.com Turning Up The Heat On Hot Runner Control IR optical sensor lenses for proximity sensing and gesture recognition have been made of Extem TPI and overmolded with nylon 12. @plastechmag 69 Plastics Technology Material s and Additives

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